How to minimize distractions at your spot

Many Sniffspot guests are looking for places to visit without distractions - so minimizing distractions translates into additional earnings. For example, spots with No dogs earn 4x more than spots with dogs Sometimes. We know that hosts have limited control over whether dogs, other domestic animals and/or people are audible and/or visible from their spot. However, below are some simple steps that hosts are taking to minimize distractions during visits.

Important caveat before we begin: the beauty of Sniffspot is the diversity of spots and, for some spots, the "distractions" are part of the attraction, so please use your own judgement with distractions in creating your dog paradise.

Resident dogs - if you have dogs that live on the property that could be audible or visible from the spot

  • If you have windows or windowed doors that adjoin the spot, close curtains or hang sheets over the windows during visits.
  • You can install frosted glass on the windows.
  • Keep your dogs away from windows or windowed doors adjoining the spot - you can do this by putting a gate or some other blocking object or you can have your dogs stay in a room away from the spot during visits
  • IMPORTANT: definitely make sure any dog doors are locked during visits.
  • Here is an example of frosted glass installed by a Sniffspot host:

Neighboring dogs - if you have dogs that live next door or pass by the spot on walks

  • If you have see-through fencing (e.g. chain link, etc.) between your spot and neighbor dogs, try adding a simple visual barrier to reduce the distraction from those dogs to your guest's dog(s). Here is an example of a simple visual barrier. 
  • Try adding a buffer zone in addition to a single fence - this could be a secondary fence 5 ft or so inside the primary fence or a hedge or shrub. It's amazing how much a simple buffer zone can do to minimize distraction.
  • Here is an example of privacy fencing installed by a Sniffspot host:

Resident other domestic animals - if you have other domestic animals (chickens, horses, etc.) that live on your property

  • It would be ideal to keep these animals away from the spot fence during visits and out of site (in a barn, henhouse, etc.)
  • If you have see-through fencing (e.g. chain link, etc.) between your spot and other domestic animals, try adding a simple visual barrier to reduce the distraction to your guest's dog(s). Here is an example of a simple visual barrier. 
  • Try adding a buffer zone in addition to a single fence - this could be a secondary fence 5 ft or so inside the primary fence or a hedge or shrub. It's amazing how much a simple buffer zone can do to minimize distraction.

Neighboring other domestic animals - if your neighbors have other domestic animals or if other domestic animals often pass by

  • If you have see-through fencing (e.g. chain link, etc.) between your spot and other domestic animals, try adding a simple visual barrier to reduce the distraction to your guest's dog(s). Here is an example of a simple visual barrier. 
  • Try adding a buffer zone in addition to a single fence - this could be a secondary fence 5 ft or so inside the primary fence or a hedge or shrub. It's amazing how much a simple buffer zone can do to minimize distraction.

Resident people - if you have family members, roommates, workpeople or renters that live on the spot property

  • Awareness is the first step. Make sure that all people on the property are aware of your Sniffspot, aware of Sniffspot best practices and aware to not approach guest dogs during visits.
  • Communication is important. Consider a shared calendar or some kind of system of notifying people on the property of Sniffspot appointments.
  • Many hosts add a sign or door hanger inside doors that adjoin the spot that remind people that they would be entering the Sniffspot.

Neighboring people - if you have neighbors that may be audible and/or visible from the spot

  • Awareness is important. Make sure that your neighbors are aware of your Sniffspot and how it works so they are not confused to see someone on your property. 
  • If you have see-through fencing (e.g. chain link, etc.) between your spot and other domestic animals, try adding a simple visual barrier to reduce the distraction to your guest's dog(s). Here is an example of a simple visual barrier. 
  • Try adding a buffer zone in addition to a single fence - this could be a secondary fence 5 ft or so inside the primary fence or a hedge or shrub. It's amazing how much a simple buffer zone can do to minimize distraction.
Did this answer your question? Thanks for the feedback There was a problem submitting your feedback. Please try again later.